Connect with us

Business Tit-Bits

INDIA’S FOREX PRESSURES

Akhilesh Bhargava

Published

on

forex; foreign

At a time when India needs to strengthen its foreign exchange inflows the most, the reverse has been happening on many fronts. India’s forex reserves have receded by USD 25bn to USD 400bn, primarily because of the outflow of about Rs.66000 crores from the Indian stock markets, by the foreign investors and the huge increase of USD 26 bn in India’s annual oil import bill, due to the rising increase in global crude oil prices. The rupee has weakened considerably and despite that, there has been no major upsurge in India’s exports, which can help to mitigate the impact of a rising dollar on our CAD. In fact, India’s exports have fallen by 3% in September 2018. On the other hand, imports led by a rising demand for oil and the rise in global oil prices, continue to be buoyant. The government has imposed curbs on imports of many non-essential items, by way of additional import duties, expecting to rein in up to USD 8 bn of forex outflows, due to these measures.

Further oil companies like IOCL, HPCL etc. have been permitted to raise forex loans of up to USD 10 bn, to partly provide for the additional foreign exchange, needed to fund India’s burgeoning oil needs, at a time when crude oil prices are northbound. The government is yet to unleash two potent measures in its armoury to combat the receding forex reserves viz. import curbs on gold and to raise dollar loans of upto USD 30 bn from NRIs, to shore up our forex reserves.

India’s present forex pressures are primarily to do with the rising crude oil prices in global markets, which at the moment hover at about USD 80 a barrel. It is expected to go up further. The last time India faced a forex crisis was in 2013 when crude oil touched $ 147 a barrel. The Indian economy, whose macros were fragile then and were not as robust as they are at present, yet weathered it. With a low inflation, rising GDP growth, oil prices below $100 a barrel and forex reserves of USD 400 bn, India is in a strong position to handle the impact of the oil price hike on its fisc. The RBI has done a prudent job in managing the weakening of the Indian rupee and maintaining forex reserves at robust levels. It has refrained from depleting our forex reserves, by selling dollars to artificially prop up the rupee value.

While these are short-term measures to mitigate a crisis, India needs long term measures to improve its forex position, by way of rising exports and FDI inflows. That needs a significant improvement in our national productivity and reforms, not just in land, labour, taxation and administration, but moreso in the financial/banking sector and red tapism and corruption, which continue unabated. India is yet not a durable attractive investment destination, which inspires long term confidence in the minds of foreign investors. Till that is not done, India’s forex inflows will remain a victim of global trends and pressures.

Business Tit-Bits

Siphoning of Sun Pharma Funds

Akhilesh Bhargava

Published

on


The importance of whistleblowers has been increasing recently in corporate India. Taking the example of Chanda Kochhar and how powerful and influential she was and the fact that she was brought down by a whistleblower, we can get a glimpse as to their importance. Another example is Dilip Shanghvi, MD of Sun Pharma. He was thought to have a squeaky clean reputation until the recent letter by a whistleblower revealed transactions involving a conflict of interest, related party transactions, auditors being compromised and other charges against him, his brother in law and his company. Related party transactions to the tune of Rs 5800 crore have been alleged. What Independent Directors, Auditors and Rating Agencies failed to point out, the whistleblower letter did. FIIs and DIIs are pulling out of the company and the price of the stock is plummeting in response to this.

Continue Reading

Business Tit-Bits

The Burden of Infrastructure NPAs

Akhilesh Bhargava

Published

on


As the country is the midst of an NPA crisis, we find that resolution are hard to come by. The only resolutions are from the Steel and Metal sector. The sector which forms the crux of the NPA crisis in India is the Infrastructure sector which accounts for roughly 25% of total NPAs. Infact, so serious are the NPAs in this sector that 1/4th of loans given turn bad and total around 2.5 lakh crore Rs. Loans given in the period 2009 to 2012 were found to be the worst. Infrastructure loans include loans given for construction of roads, bridges, highways, ports and power sector loans. Corruption, government not living up to its end of the deal and banks rushing to give loans without going through boanfides of the firm are the main reasons. The infrastructure sector bad loan problem has turned into a chronic one and no resolution worth talking about has taken place.

Continue Reading

Business Tit-Bits

The Diamond Cheats

Akhilesh Bhargava

Published

on


We take a look into the glamorous diamond industry in India, said to be the largest in the world. Being a very close-knit one in terms of belonging to a particular community and often only within family members, the scope for manipulation becomes easy. The diamond industry has become tainted with bogus exports, money laundering practices, massive NPAs, round-tripping of money etc. Names such as Jatin Mehta, Mehul Chokshi and Nirav Modi have become synonymous with the industry and hence banks are now restricting their exposure to the sector and implementing tougher conditions for lending money to the beleaguered diamond traders.

Continue Reading

Popular Stories

Copyright © 2018 Theo Connect Pvt. Ltd.