Connect with us

International News

No time, speed limit on North Korea denuclearisation: Donald Trump

News Desk

Published

on

Trump

President Donald Trump said on Tuesday there is no hurry to denuclearise North Korea under his accord with Kim Jong-un — a shift in tone from when the US leader said the process would start very soon.

Last month, Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un held historic talks and pledged to denuclearise the Korean peninsula. The accord did not have a timetable for the process or plan to carry it out. Since the meeting between Trump and Kim on June 12, there has been little-reported progress towards denuclearisation.

“Discussions are ongoing and they’re going very, very well,” Trump told reporters. “We have no time limit. We have no speed limit.” Trump said he discussed North Korea with Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday at their summit in Helsinki.

Last week, North Korea accused the US of making “gangster-like” demands for the process, and branded the US attitude at high-level talks as “extremely troubling”.

The White House has hailed the summit between Kim and Trump in Singapore as a major breakthrough toward disarming the isolated, nuclear-armed North in exchange for easing of sanctions and other help with economic development.

But since then, Trump has suggested that dismantling North Korea’s nuclear arsenal could be some way off. Speaking at a press conference in the UK last week, the US President said negotiations with Pyongyang would be “probably a longer process than anybody would like”.

International News

Three Indian students among 15 finalists in global science challenge

Published

on

By

indian

The Indian teenagers among 15 finalists are Samay Godika, 16, and Nikhiya Shamsher, 16, from Bengaluru and Kavya Negi, 18, from Delhi. 

 

Washington | Three Indian students have made it to the finals of the prestigious annual Breakthrough Junior Challenge, a global science competition for teenagers to share their passion for mathematics and science.

The three Indian students are among 15 finalists of more than 12,000 original registrants from around the world who submitted engaging and imaginative videos to demonstrate difficult scientific concepts and theories in the physical or life sciences.

The Indian teenagers are Samay Godika, 16, and Nikhiya Shamsher, 16, from Bengaluru and Kavya Negi, 18, from Delhi.

The winner will be announced on November 4 in Silicon Valley and get a USD 250,000 college scholarship. The science teacher who inspired the winning student will get USD 50,000. The winner’s school will also receive a state-of-the-art science lab worth USD 100,000.

Nikhiya was the top scorer in the popular vote contest with more than 25,000 likes, shares and positive reactions for her video on spacetime and gravity posted on the Breakthrough Facebook page. Nikhiya will receive automatic entry into the final round of judging.

Nikhiya describes herself as an inventor and an innovator. She has a patent pending on a point of care, home-based salivary diagnostic test for chronic smokers to detect the risk of oral cancer.

“I conducted my study at IISC, Bengaluru and my diagnostic test has an accuracy of 96 per cent. It’s a simple product that a person can use at home and one test costs less than 50 cents, said Nikhiya, who is also the founderpreneur of an e-commerce website, 100 per cent of the profits of which are used to set up and fund Math and Science Laboratories in schools and colleges that don’t have any.

Her project is about 4-Dimensional Space-Time and Gravity. I would love to pursue theoretical physics, simply because it reveals many secrets of the universe. And of course, an important component of theoretical physics is math. I believe math is the language by which the universe speaks to itself, she said.

Kavya from Delhi believes that her video about Hawking Radiation might stand a chance to win because it showcases in-depth dive to the concept.

Hawking Radiation is a very feeble emission of particles near the event horizon of a black hole caused when virtual particles (created near the event horizon) escape, she said.

“I have been able to explain not just Hawking Radiation but also black hole explosion in three minutes,” Kavya said. Aspiring to be physics researcher as well as a science communicator, Kavya believes that scientists should be celebrated just as much as musicians, actors or sportsmen.  My vision is to see a scientific utopia which starts with scientific communication, she said. Samay, an 11th grader, in his project has explored various aspects of Circadian Rhythm.

“I first heard about Circadian Rhythm when it was in the news as the 2017 Nobel Prize-winning topic in Medicine. I zeroed in on this topic as it seemed to impact many facets of daily lives, including things like my asthma, the difficulty I face getting up early in the morning, etc,” he said.  Samay wants to pursue a formal programme in neuroscience.

“Our brain seems to be the most complex system in this world and the least understood. I am interested in building a solid foundation in this area. In parallel, I would also like to pursue a programme that allows me to formally learn Data Sciences,” he said. “This skill will equip me to model complex problems. A combination of neuroscience and data science skills could enable me to devise solutions for some of the most debilitating diseases faced by mankind,” Samay said.

Since its launch, the Breakthrough Junior Challenge has reached 190 countries, and the 2018 instalment of the global competition attracted more than 12,000 registrants, a media release said.

The contest is designed to inspire creative thinking about fundamental concepts in the life sciences, physics, and mathematics.

The field was reduced to 29 semifinalists, which represented the top submissions after two rounds of judging: first, a mandatory peer review, followed by an evaluation panel of judges, Breakthrough said.

The 15 finalist videos were chosen by the Selection Committee, comprising among others: Salman Khan, CEO, Founder, Khan Academy; author and educator Lucy Hawking; Mae Jemison, science literacy expert, former astronaut, and Principal, 100 Year Starship; retired NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly; Nima Arkani-Hamed, Professor of Physics, Institute for Advanced Study and Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics Laureate; and Rachel Crane, Space and Science Correspondent, CNN.

Continue Reading

International News

India remains committed to objective of decolonisation: Misra at United Nations

Published

on

By

united nations

Misra noted that when the United Nations was established in 1945, almost a third of the world’s population lived in territories that were non-self-governing.

 

United Nations| India has called for expediting the efforts to conclude the decolonisation of 17 non-self-governing territories, saying a pragmatic approach towards the “long-drawn process” will lead to the fulfilment of legitimate wishes of the people.

Speaking at the ‘General Debate on Decolonisation’ in the General Assembly’s Fourth Committee, Minister in India’s Permanent Mission to the UN Deepak Misra stressed that there were still 17 non-self-governing territories, which are in various stages of the decolonisation process on the ‘Agenda of the Committee on Decolonisation’.

“We must step up our efforts to reach the conclusion of this long-drawn process,” he said on Monday.

He voiced India’s commitment to the objective of decolonisation, saying the country offers firm support to further accelerate the process.

Misra noted that when the United Nations was established in 1945, almost a third of the world’s population lived in territories that were non-self-governing and were dependent on colonial powers.

“As a country that itself was colonised, India has always been in the forefront of the struggle against colonialism and apartheid since its own independence seven decades ago,” he said.

Since the creation of the United Nations, more than 80 former colonies have gained their independence and joined the world body.

Sustained collective efforts by the UN membership has today led to fewer than two million people living in non-self-governing territories, according to UN documentation.

However, even after seven decades, the process of decolonisation that began with India’s own independence still remains unfinished.

In 2011 the General Assembly had to proclaim the current decade 2011-2020 as the ‘Third International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism’, which is now coming close to conclusion.

Misra said that in this inter-connected world, India believes that pursuing a pragmatic approach towards decolonisation would surely lead to the fulfilment of legitimate wishes of the people of non-self governing territories.

“The complex challenges facing the present world can only be met by coordinating our responses in a spirit of cooperation and collaboration.

“We must prioritise increased cooperation with international agencies and actors and channelise resources for the 17 Non-Self Governing Territories,” he said.

Misra said that this would help enable these territories to build capacities in their quest towards their long cherished goals.

Continue Reading

International News

Khashoggi dsappearance: Turkey, US put pressure on Saudi Arabia

Published

on

By

Jamal Khashoggi

Khashoggi is a former government adviser who fled Saudi Arabia in September 2017 and lived in the US fearing arrest back home.

 

Istanbul, Oct 11 (AFP) Turkey and the United States on Thursday ratcheted up the pressure on Saudi Arabia to explain how a journalist vanished after entering its Istanbul consulate last week, with President Recep Tayyip Erdogan urging the release of CCTV footage from the mission.

The Washington Post, which Khashoggi wrote for, added to the still unresolved mystery by reporting Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman had ordered an operation to “lure” the critical journalist back home.

Khashoggi, a Saudi national whose articles have criticised the prince, has not been seen since October 2 when he went to the consulate in Istanbul to obtain official documents for his upcoming marriage.

Turkish officials have said he was killed — reportedly by a 15-man “assassination team” that arrived on two planes — but Riyadh denies that.

The disappearance has captured international headlines and threatens to harm Saudi’s relations with both Ankara and Washington, as well as damage efforts by Prince Mohammed to improve the country’s image.

Erdogan challenged Saudi Arabia to provide CCTV images to back up its account that Khashoggi had left the consulate safely, indicating he did not find the current Saudi explanations sufficient.

“Is it possible there were no camera systems in a consulate, in an embassy?” he asked.

“If a bird flew, or a fly or a mosquito appeared, the systems would capture this; they (Saudi Arabia) have the most cutting-edge systems,” he was quoted as saying.

The consulate said CCTV cameras were not working that day and dismissed the murder claims as “baseless”.

The case is also threatening the strong relationship the Trump administration has built with Prince Mohammed, who wants to turn the oil-rich conservative kingdom into a hub for innovation and reform.

The two sides have worked together in confronting Iran despite growing concern over the prince’s campaign against dissidents, which critics say has revealed the true face of his rule.

In a reversal from Washington’s initial low-key response, President Donald Trump expressed determination to get to the bottom of the matter.

“We can’t let it happen. And we’re being very tough and we have investigators over there and we’re working with Turkey and frankly we’re working with Saudi Arabia,” Trump said in an interview with “Fox and Friends”.

However, a Turkish diplomatic source quoted by the state-run Anadolu news agency denied US investigators had been tasked to work on the case.

And Trump later said the United States was not limiting arms sales to Saudi Arabia over the case. “They’re going to take that money and spend it in Russia or China or someplace else,” he said.

Jeremy Hunt, the foreign secretary of key Saudi ally and trade partner, Britain, told AFP there would be “serious consequences” if the allegations were true.

Saudi Arabia also dropped a bid to join the world’s club of French-speaking countries, The International Organisation of the Francophonie (OIF).

Khashoggi is a former government adviser who fled Saudi Arabia in September 2017 and lived in the US fearing arrest back home.

In his columns for the Washington Post and comments elsewhere, he was critical of some policies of Mohammed bin Salman as well as Riyadh’s role in the war in Yemen.

While unnamed Turkish officials quoted in the media have been giving sometimes macabre details of the alleged murder, Erdogan has so far been more circumspect.

Erdogan said it would “not be right” to comment yet but said he had “concerns”.

“It’s not possible for us to stay silent regarding an incident like this,” he said.

Human Rights Watch urged Prince Mohammed to “release all evidence and information” concerning Khashoggi’s status Turkish authorities have been given permission to search the consulate — Saudi sovereign territory — but this has not yet taken place.

Continue Reading

Live TV – 24×7

Headlines

Popular Stories

Copyright © 2018 Theo Connect Pvt. Ltd.